Monthly Archives: June 2018

Crowdsourcing iPhone App Lets Sighted People Lend Their Eyes to the Blind

With VizWiz, the blind can take a picture, ask a question, and get an answer back from a real person in seconds.

What’s the News: With the web as their eyes, the blind will able to read menus, identify canned foods, and tell whether that park has any free benches without having to walk over. That’s the vision of a team of computer scientists behind an iPhone app called VizWiz, which lets people take a photo of whatever’s perplexing them, record a question like “What denomination is this bill?” and send it off to real people online who’ll respond in a matter of seconds with “That’s a 20.”

How the Heck:

  • Blind people have workarounds for the kinds of tasks the sighted use their eyes for—folding dollar bills in certain shapes, keeping the cans of tomatoes separate from the cans of beans, and so on—but these measures often require the input of a sighted person at some point, and they’re not very efficient. An app like this would give the blind more independence.
  • Many simple tasks, like reading an address off a letter, are phenomenally difficult for computer intelligences. So the scientists are working with Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, a system that employs people around the world to do odd jobs computers can’t, like choosing the best picture for a product website or reading signs in photographs.
  • Then, to solve the problem of speed, the team wrote a program called quikTurkit that works to recruit people even before the question is sent, so there’s always someone on hand to answer. In the latest version of VizWiz, the average turnaround time on a question was 27 seconds. Not bad.

The Future Holds: VizWiz, which is being tested by teams of blind volunteers, hasn’t left the lab yet. But the volunteers are fans: it would be “very useful,” one said (via New Scientist), “because I get so frustrated when I need sighted help and no one is there.” Though an in-depth study [pdf] on VizWiz was released last year, there’s no word yet from the scientists on when this will hit the market. Soon, one hopes.

The App That Lets Users Lend Their Eyes, And Blind People See Things In A New Way

It’s always nice when you can lend a hand to someone in need, but this new app takes that idea to another level: Thanks to Be My Eyes, you’ll now be able to actually lend your eyes to a visually impaired person.

The new iOS app provides a video stream, similar to Apple’s FaceTime video calling, that connects someone visually impaired with someone able to see and willing to help out. The app’s inventor, Hans Jørgen Wiberg, was inspired by FaceTime and how some of his blind friends were using it for visual help.

“With FaceTime, you can’t call a random volunteer,” says Wiberg. “That’s where I came up with the idea of making this group of volunteers who can easily answer a question whenever they have time and if not, someone else will step in.”

The examples the company shows in its product video include visually impaired users getting help with things like reading an expiration date, figuring out what a photograph looks like, and reading signs in an unfamiliar location. The app is more about helping with particularly difficult moments, rather than long periods of assistance.

Opening the app, you’re prompted to select if you are sighted or if you need help (assuming you have accessibility features turned on), and then sign up for an account. If you sign up as a helper, that’s it, you wait until you get a notification to be someone’s eyes. You can share that you’re using the app across social media to gain points in the app, which you also gain for successfully helping someone. The points are used to create a rating system for determining the best helpers. If you need help seeing you’ll be taken to a screen that says “connect to the first helper available.” The screen automatically enables voiceover (reading text on the screen) from this point on as well.

You wouldn’t be blamed for thinking that it’s a little incompatible that someone who can’t see—or has trouble with their vision—would be using a touch-screen mobile phone to begin with. That’s not the case at all; Apple has been particularly aggressive with its accessibility features. “From what we find, a clear majority of blind smartphone users are on iPhone—in Europe almost exclusively,” says cofounder Thelle Kristensen. “IOS has had accessibility functions for the blind since iOS 3 that came with iPhone 3GS in 2009 and has since gotten continuously better.”

Be My Eyes is currently only available for iOS, but Kristensen hopes to add Android in the future through grant funding. The nonprofit also has a GitHub repository for developers interested in speeding the process along for another mobile operating system like Android or Windows Phone.

Of course, beyond the platform issues one of the main challenges a service like this faces is having someone available to help when they’re needed. “We do not have a clear picture of how many helpers are needed, but our estimate is that if we have two helpers per blind person we should be good,” explains Wiberg. “And right now it is more like 10 to 1.”

Within 10 hours of the app’s launch, the service already had about 4,000 helpers and about 500 visually impaired people signed up. In the small-scale testing done prior to launch there weren’t any problems reaching helpers when they were needed. Wiberg is visually impaired himself and came up with the idea for the app when he was a consultant in the Danish blind community. He first gave a TEDx talk about Be My Eyes back in September of 2013.

Be My Eyes is just one of the ways mobile devices are helping assist those in need. Apple, for one, touts its accessibility features, not only for vision, but also for hearing, physical and motor skills, and learning and literacy. And there are other third-party developers building things like a Braille keyboard or light sensor. The Light Detector app, for instance, uses the phone’s camera to turn natural or artificial light into sound so someone knows if an area is dark or light.

For now, Wiberg does not have plans to evolve Be My Eyes to products like Google Glass, but he hasn’t written off the idea entirely: “We would love to try it out,” he says.

ABOUT HANDPHONE

WHAT THE PURPOSE OF THE HAND PHONE ?

HistoryInventor of the first mobile phone system is Martin Cooper, a Motorola employee on April 3, 1973, although widely touted is the inventor of the cell phone of one of a team of Motorola division (division where Cooper worked) with the first model is the DynaTAC. Idea proposed by Cooper is a communication tool that is small and easy to carry travel flexibly.Cooper and his team faced the challenge of how to include all electronic material into such a small device for the first time. But eventually a first cell phone was successfully completed with a total weight of weighing two kilograms. To produce it, Motorola would cost the equivalent of U.S. $ 1 million. “In 1983, the portable cellular phone worth U.S. $ 4 thousand (Rp36 million) equivalent to U.S. $ 10 thousand (Rp90 million).After successfully producing mobile phones, the next biggest challenge is adapting infrastructure to support the mobile phone communication system by creating a network system that only requires 3 MHz spectrum, the equivalent of five TV channels are channeled to the whole world.Other figures are known to be very instrumental in the mobile communications world is Amos Joel Jr. who was born in Philadelphia, March 12, 1918, he was recognized worldwide as an expert in the field of switching. He received a bachelor’s degree (1940) and master’s (1942) in electronic engineering from MIT.

Not long after studies, he began his career over 43 years (from July 1940-March 1983) at the Bell Telephone Laboratories, where he received more than 70 U.S. patents in the field of telecommunications, particularly in the field of switching. Amos E Joel Jr., making the system connector (switching) from one area of ​​the cell phone to another cell area. Switching it should work when mobile users move or move from one cell to another cell so that the conversation is not interrupted. Because Joel Amos invention is the use of mobile phones to be comfortable.Functions and featuresIn addition to working to make and receive phone calls, the phone also has the function generally sending and receiving short messages (short message service, SMS). There is also a provider of mobile phone services in some countries that provide third generation (3G) services by adding videophone, as a means of payment, as well as for online television on their mobile phones. Now, mobile phones into multifunctional gadgets. Following the development of digital technology, now the phone is also equipped with a wide selection of features, such as can capture radio and television broadcasts, the software audio players (MP3) and video, digital camera, game, and internet services (WAP, GPRS, 3G). In addition to these features, the phone is now embedded computer features. So on the phone, people can change the function of the phone is a mini computer. In the business world, this feature is very helpful for business people to do all the work in one place and makes the job completed in a short time.Today, the role of mobile phones have become a necessity Everyday Primer, the following categories of mobile phones by Function:Business mobile phone type of this is aimed at people who want a business device in your hand, usually have a phone that has this capability quite smart phones “smartphones”. Beragai business applications contained in this phone and can make your office work can be seen and done in a mobile phone.Mobile Entertainment is a mobile phone type of multimedia manifold, where all activities related to music, art, photos, and other social can be fixed by a mobile phone. Many of these type of phone has its own variants, such as Mobile Music, Mobile Camera, Mobile Internet and Social.Fashion mobile phone type of this greater reliance on zoom, and can make its owner very satisfied though with features that impressed “potluck”. But behind it all, a Mobile Fashion can be worth many times the price of sophisticated mobile phones. Phones today can be found more valuable than the price of a vehicle even more expensive than the price of a house.Standard mobile phone type of this is intended for those who want a phone that is simple, features embedded in this phone is a core feature, no new technology is pinned.

Intel Xeon E7-4800/8800 V3 Launched: Bigger, Faster, And Now With AVX2 + TSX

Intel announced its new Xeon E7-4800 V3 and E7-8800 V3 line-up. Traditionally, these are the x86 chips Intel positions to go after the lower end of the IBM Power and Oracle (Sun) SPARC architectures. These V3 chips scale from 2-way designs up to 8-way designs and include extra RAS (reliability, availability and scalability) features to serve mission-critical applications.

The new V3 release is socket-compatible with the V2 parts for ease of integration with existing DDR3 designs, but they can also utilize DDR4 in newer platforms. What we are essentially seeing is an upgrade from the Ivy Bridge-EX architecture to the new Haswell-EX architecture, bringing 20 percent more cores and cache, as well as faster memory. The new Haswell-EX family scales to 18 cores and 45 MB of last level cache and can handle up to 6 TB of RAM.

Intel provides a market share view against IBM and Sun in terms of units sold, and the trend shows clear growth. What it does not do is note that the average selling price for the IBM and Sun machines are much higher than Intel platforms.

Laser technology advances microchip production

A new process for cutting silicon wafers could streamline the production of smaller and more powerful microchips for electronic devices.

Electronic chips are built on small pieces of silicon that are cut from silicon sheets, called wafers, in a process known as dicing. Currently, dicing is performed by mechanical sawing or laser cutting, but these approaches can cause problems. Sawing can cause thin wafers to break or layers of silicon to separate. The heat generated by laser cutting can leave micro cracks in the silicon and produces molten debris. Coolants or protective coatings are then required, adding to the production cost.

A team of researchers at the A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research) Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology has developed a new technique that uses laser-induced thermal cracking technology. The silicon expands as a near-infrared laser heats it, then contracts as it cools, leading to stress that causes the silicon to break along the laser line. The result is a crackfree silicon chip with a smooth surface finish. The process creates no debris, cuts 10 to 20 times faster than currently used techniques, and increases productivity because more silicon pieces can be cut from one wafer. Together with the fact that the near-infrared laser is energy-efficient and consumes little power, these improvements over sawing and laser cutting result in a dramatic improvement in efficiency.

According to the research team, the new dicing technology will advance the production of microchips for electronic devices. It will enable the production of chips that are thinner and capable of supporting higher processing speeds, making for smaller and more powerful devices.

HP Has Enough Workers to Fill a City—And It Needs Them All

Silicon Valley technology giant HP will lay off as many as 30,000 more people as part of its split into two separate companies, the company told analysts this week. This comes on top of the 55,000 jobs HP has been in the process of shedding in recent years. Even so, HP is still as large as a mid-sized US city. As of May, according to Forbes, the company numbered 302,000. But what in the world do all those people do?

In an era in which WhatsApp can serve 900 million users with just 50 engineers, the massive enterprise tech company feels like an anachronism. In HP’s case, its huge headcount doesn’t even include outsourced labor, such as call center operators or the assembly line workers who actually build all those printers and laptops. But it turns out that the business of selling technology to businesses has long required something old-fashioned: lots and lots of people (at least for now).

The typical consumer probably thinks of HP as a printer and PC company, but it’s much more than that. It’s also a massive information technology consulting operation with a large portfolio of business software and cloud computing offerings. HP’s forthcoming reorganization will create two businesses, one called called HP Enterprise, which will include its consulting and software businesses, and the other called HP Inc., which will continue to sell printers and PCs. The current round of layoffs are aimed at the HP Enterprise side. HP doesn’t break down how many employees work in each of its divisions, but HP Enterprise is likely where the bulk of its employees work, judging in part by the size of other large IT services companies (IBM had 379,592 employees last year; Accenture had 323,000).

Forrester vice president Peter Burris says the reason companies like HP and IBM need so many workers is that selling software to enterprise customers is far different from creating software for consumers.

All 900 million WhatsApp users use the exact same app. You download it an app store, and that’s that. But big companies like banks, insurance companies, and large hospitals need software tailored to their particular needs. Instead of just building the application once and selling it to a client, these companies and their clients have an ongoing relationship.

That’s because IT consultants aren’t just going in and telling a customer what to do. Typically, the consulting firm is involved in planning, building, maintaining, and supporting new software. That means talking with employees about what they need out of a new piece of software, working with other software vendors on integrations between products, training employees, and fielding tech support calls. And that takes a lot of people. Many of those consultants work with customers on an ongoing basis, limiting the number of different customers any one employee can work with. That’s the difference between making a software product like WhatsApp and selling consulting services.

“A product sale has a clear moment where a title is exchanged,” he says. “But with services, the sale happens over time. It’s a process, You’re literally transferring knowledge about how to solve problems.”

Who Needs an Army?

It’s easy to be skeptical about whether customers are really getting their money’s worth from big companies, considering that 68 percent of all large IT projects fail. Surely there are instances of a company overselling its services, or trying to save a doomed project by simply throwing more people at the problem. You can count on large bureaucracies to add inefficiencies and bloat to any project.

That’s starting to change, however. Yes, “cloud computing” is an over-broad term, but cloud-based services like Amazon Web Services and Salesforce have changed the way large companies do business. It’s easier than ever for a business manager to simply buy some software and have their employees start using it immediately.

In the past, even something as simple as an instant messaging application that integrates with your company’s project management system would have been an ordeal to implement. You would have had to negotiate a price for a piece of software like IBM’s Sametime, set up up a new server in your data center, install software on your employees’ desktops, and hire consultants to integrate your project management software with the instant messaging server.

Today, you could just sign up for Slack, a trendy workplace chat app, and start using it over the web immediately without ever having to talk with a salesperson. Slack comes with dozens of integrations with other applications right out of the box. It even has an application programming interface—API for short—that makes it easy for app developers to build support for Slack right into their own products. And Slack is hardly unique amongst new age business apps in offering easy integrations. Tools like Zapier make it easy for even non-programmers to stitch different applications together. The upshot is that, increasingly, you don’t need an army of consultants to get all your software up and running and working together.

Meanwhile, open source technology is making it easier to use freely available components, freeing software developers from building the same common features again and again. Cloud services and open source software were once most associated with small startups looking to save money. But as these startups—Facebook, for example—have grown into large enterprises, they’ve often stuck with these newer tools, and more established organizations are following suit.

IT’s Legacy

Of course not all of a company’s software can be replaced by off-the-shelf apps. And there are plenty of consultants that specialize in customizing cloud applications like Salesforce. But Burris points out that there’s little to no advantage to building custom software for many common business processes, such as financial reporting or accounts payable systems. A custom payroll app probably won’t make your company more competitive. So there’s a strong incentive to simply move over to one-size fits all business applications that can be supported in much the same way WhatsApp is.

The HPs and IBMs of the world have responded to these shifts by offering cloud services and ready-made business applications of their own. That’s a big part of why HP and IBM are shedding jobs right now. “In general software companies are better for owners than services businesses are,” Burris explains. “In a software business, a programmer can write a piece of code that can be used by millions of different customers and users. That intellectual property, that information about a problem, is now made available to a whole pile of people at the same time.”

But the good news for the armies of consultants working for these companies is that most older companies that still have enormous amounts of data stored in old software—what people in the IT business call “legacy” systems. It will take countless hours to modernize all of those legacy systems—and, Burris says the place most of these companies are going to turn are the legacy tech giants—companies like HP and IBM—that helped build a lot of these systems in the first place

Apple Surpassed Samsung As Global Phone Market Leader, Says Report

For the fourth quarter of 2014, Apple AAPL -0.55% reported a record-breaking profit of $18 billion — which is the largest ever reported by a public company – while Samsung said its profits actually dropped 37% year-on-year. After those results, there was speculation that Apple had become the world’s largest smartphone manufacturer again. IT research firm Gartner is now claiming that Apple has narrowly surpassed Samsung in smartphone sales.

Apple sold 74.8 million iPhones compared to Samsung’s sales of 73 million smartphones in the fourth quarter of last year. This is a dramatic change from one year earlier when Samsung sold 83.3 million smartphones against Apple’s 50.2 million iPhone sales. Apple’s win over Samsung in Q4 2014 is the first time that the Cupertino giant sold the most number of smartphones globally since 2011. For Q4 2014, Apple hit 20.4% for the global smartphone marketshare, surpassing Samsung’s 19.9% share. Lenovo  took the third place spot through its sales of Lenovo and Motorola mobile phones for the fourth quarter of 2014. Lenovo hit a 6.6% market share, which is 47.6% growth year-over-year. Lenovo acquired Motorola’s mobile division in October 2014.

“Samsung’s performance in the smartphone market deteriorated further in the fourth quarter of 2014, when it lost nearly 10 percentage points in market share,” said Gartner’s principal research analyst Anshul Gupta in a company statement. “Samsung continues to struggle to control its falling smartphone share, which was at its highest in the third quarter of 2013. This downward trend shows that Samsung’s share of profitable premium smartphone users has come under significant pressure.” In a separate study, research firm Strategy Analytics claimed that Apple accounted for 89% of all smartphone profits for Q4 2014 at an estimated $18.8 billion compared to Android’s $2.4 billion. Samsung’s response to the iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus is the Galaxy S6 and the Galaxy S6 Edge, launching worldwide on April 10th — which should drive up the numbers for the Korean giant in 2015.

Chinese mobile company Xiaomi is nipping at the heels of the major smartphone players by offering high quality Android devices at a lower cost. Out of all of the global smartphone makers, Xiaomi saw the largest jump at triple its sales compared to a year ago. Xiaomi shipped 18.6 million smartphones in Q4 2014, behind Huawei’s 21 million and Lenovo’s 24 million.

Apple is currently dominating the premium phone market and Chinese mobile phone companies are offering quality devices in the lower cost market. This is causing Samsung to feel the pressure in both markets. Samsung has to stay innovative to maintain its strong marketshare, otherwise its profits will continue to drop. Gartner research director Roberta Cozza said that Samsung can secure its longer-term differentiation by offering a solid ecosystem of apps, content and services.

Even though Samsung suffered a loss during the fourth quarter of 2014, they still remained the largest smartphone vendor for the year. In 2014, Samsung shipped about 307.5 million smartphones while Apple shipped an estimated 191.4 million devices.

How many smartphones shipped around the world altogether in 2014? About 1.2 billion smartphones were shipped in 2014, up from 969.7 million in 2013. Statistically, every two out of three mobile phones that shipped last year were smartphones. Smartphones are simply becoming ubiquitous around the world and it will be interesting to see who comes out on top over the next few quarters.

How Samsung Became the World’s No. 1 Smartphone Maker

I’m in a black Mercedes-Benz (DAI:GR) van with three Samsung Electronics PR people heading toward Yongin, a city about 45 minutes south of Seoul. Yongin is South Korea’s Orlando: a nondescript, fast-growing city known for its tourist attractions, especially Everland Resort, the country’s largest theme park. But the van isn’t going to Everland. We’re headed to a far more profitable theme park: the Samsung Human Resources Development Center, where the theme just happens to be Samsung.

The complex’s formal name is Changjo Kwan, which translates as Creativity Institute. It’s a massive structure with a traditional Korean roof, set in parklike surroundings. In a breezeway, a map carved in stone tiles divides the earth into two categories: countries where Samsung conducts business, indicated by blue lights; and countries where Samsung will conduct business, indicated by red. The map is mostly blue. In the lobby, an engraving in Korean and English proclaims: “We will devote our human resources and technology to create superior products and services, thereby contributing to a better global society.” Another sign says in English: “Go! Go! Go

More than 50,000 employees pass through Changjo Kwan and its sister facilities in a given year. In sessions that last anywhere from a few days to several months, they are inculcated in all things Samsung: They learn about the three P’s (products, process, and people); they learn about “global management” so that Samsung can expand into new markets; some employees go through the exercise of making kimchi together, to learn about teamwork and Korean culture.

Video: Exclusive: What’s in Samsung’s Secret Sauce

They will stay in single or shared rooms, depending on seniority, on floors named and themed after artists. The Magritte floor has clouds on the carpet and upside-down table lamps on the ceiling. In a hallway, the recorded voice of a man speaking Korean comes over the loudspeakers. “Those are some remarks the chairman made some years ago,” a Samsung employee explains.

She’s referring to Lee Kun Hee, the 71-year-old chairman of Samsung Electronics, who declined to be interviewed for this article. Despite making headlines in 2008, when he was convicted of tax evasion, and 2009, when he was pardoned by South Korea’s president, he maintains a low profile. Except within Samsung, that is, where he’s omnipresent. It’s not just the slogans over the sound system; Samsung’s internal practices and external strategies—from how TVs are designed to the company’s philosophy of “perpetual crisis”—all spring from the codified teachings of the chairman

Since Lee took control of Samsung in 1987, sales have surged to $179 billion last year, making it the world’s largest electronics company by revenue. That makes Samsung Electronics the world’s largest electronics company by revenue. For all its global reach, though, the company remains opaque. We all know the story of Steve Jobs and Apple (AAPL), Akio Morita and Sony (SNE). But Samsung and Lee Kun Hee? People may bring up the South Korean government’s support of local champions and access to easy capital, but within the company it all goes back to Chairman Lee and the Frankfurt Room.

Story: The iPhone 5’s A6 Chip Could Be Apple’s Sweetest Revenge Against Samsung

It doesn’t look like much: early 1990s vintage décor and a large table with a fake flower centerpiece. But the Frankfurt Room is to Changjo Kwan as the Clementine Chapel is to St. Peter’s Basilica: an extra-special place inside an already special place. Photography is forbidden; people whisper when inside. It’s a meticulous recreation of the drab conference room in the German hotel where, in 1993, Chairman Lee gathered his lieutenants and laid out a plan to transform Samsung, then a second-tier TV manufacturer, into the biggest, most powerful electronics manufacturer on earth. It would require going from a high-volume, low-quality manufacturer to a high-quality one, even if that meant sacrificing sales. It would mean looking past the borders of South Korea and taking on the world.

Samsung is having a moment. It’s dominant in TVs and sells a lot of washing machines, but it’s smartphones that made Samsung as recognizable a presence around the world as Walt Disney (DIS) and Toyota Motor (TM). If Samsung isn’t yet as lustrous a brand as Apple, it’s finding success as the anti-Apple—Galaxy smartphones outsell iPhones. And Samsung is probably the only other company that can throw a product introduction and have people line up around a city block, as they did in New York City on March 14 for the launch of the Galaxy S 4. That never used to happen when Samsung unveiled a refrigerator—although the kimchi-specific models made for the Korean market are really quite impressive

Smart glasses offer users a keyboard to type text

K-Glass, smart glasses reinforced with augmented reality (AR) that were first developed by the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in 2014, with the second version released in 2015, is back with an even stronger model. The latest version, which KAIST researchers are calling K-Glass 3, allows users to text a message or type in key words for Internet surfing by offering a virtual keyboard for text and even one for a piano.

Currently, most wearable head-mounted displays (HMDs) suffer from a lack of rich user interfaces, short battery lives, and heavy weight. Some HMDs, such as Google Glass, use a touch panel and voice commands as an interface, but they are considered merely an extension of smartphones and are not optimized for wearable smart glasses. Recently, gaze recognition was proposed for HMDs including K-Glass 2, but gaze is insufficient to realize a natural user interface (UI) and experience (UX), such as user’s gesture recognition, due to its limited interactivity and lengthy gaze-calibration time, which can be up to several minutes.

As a solution, Professor Hoi-Jun Yoo and his team from the Electrical Engineering Department recently developed K-Glass 3 with a low-power natural UI and UX processor to enable convenient typing and screen pointing on HMDs with just bare hands. This processor is composed of a pre-processing core to implement stereo vision, seven deep-learning cores to accelerate real-time scene recognition within 33 milliseconds, and one rendering engine for the display.

The stereo-vision camera, located on the front of K-Glass 3, works in a manner similar to three dimension (3D) sensing in human vision. The camera’s two lenses, displayed horizontally from one another just like depth perception produced by left and right eyes, take pictures of the same objects or scenes and combine these two different images to extract spatial depth information, which is necessary to reconstruct 3D environments. The camera’s vision algorithm has an energy efficiency of 20 milliwatts on average, allowing it to operate in the Glass more than 24 hours without interruption.

The research team adopted deep-learning-multi core technology dedicated for mobile devices to recognize user’s gestures based on the depth information. This technology has greatly improved the Glass’s recognition accuracy with images and speech, while shortening the time needed to process and analyze data. In addition, the Glass’s multi-core processor is advanced enough to become idle when it detects no motion from users. Instead, it executes complex deep-learning algorithms with a minimal power to achieve high performance.

Professor Yoo said, “We have succeeded in fabricating a low-power multi-core processer that consumes only 126.1 milliwatts of power with a high efficiency rate. It is essential to develop a smaller, lighter, and low-power processor if we want to incorporate the widespread use of smart glasses and wearable devices into everyday life. K-Glass 3’s more intuitive UI and convenient UX permit users to enjoy enhanced AR experiences such as a keyboard or a better, more responsive mouse.”

Along with the research team, UX Factory, a Korean UI and UX developer, participated in the K-Glass 3 project.

These research results entitled “A 126.1mW Real-Time Natural UI/UX Processor with Embedded Deep-Learning Core for Low-Power Smart Glasses” (paper number 14.1, lead author: Seong-Wook Park, a doctoral student in the Electrical Engineering Department, KAIST) were presented at the 2016 IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) that took place January 31-February 4, 2016 in San Francisco, California.

Microsoft and Nokia complete mobile phone unit deal

yyMicrosoft has completed its purchase of Nokia’s mobile phone business for 5.44bn euros ($7.5bn; £4.5bn).

The deal between the two firms should have been completed earlier this year but it was delayed by a hold-up in regulatory approvals.

The sale will see the end of production of mobile phones by Nokia.

“Today we welcome the Nokia devices and services business to our family,” said Microsoft chief executive Satya Nadella.

“The mobile capabilities and assets they bring will advance our transformation.”

The Finnish company will now focus on networks, mapping services and technology development and licences.

Two Nokia plants will remain outside the deal – a manufacturing unit in Chennai, India, subject to an asset freeze by Indian tax authorities, and the Masan plant in South Korea, which it plans to shut down.

Former Nokia chief executive Stephen Elop has become executive vice president of the Microsoft devices group, in charge of Lumia smartphones and tablets, Nokia mobile phones, Xbox hardware, Microsoft Surface, and Perceptive Pixel (PPI) products

Nokia Microsoft mobile deal gets shareholder go ahead

Shareholders of the phonemaker Nokia have agreed to sell their mobile phone business to technology giant Microsoft for 5.4bn euros ($7.2 bn; £4.5bn).

The deal goes ahead despite objections from some investors who opposed the sale of a Finnish asset.

Regulators must clear the sale, but is expected to close early next year.

In September, Microsoft agreed to buy the mobile phone business and licence patents from Nokia.

Nokia has seen its share of the smartphone market shrink as competitors such as Apple and Samsung have risen in popularity.

‘Feels good’

Tuesday’s deal was approved by 99.5% of Nokia’s 3,900 investors at a meeting for shareholders in the Finnish capital of Helsinki.

At the five-hour-long shareholder meeting, Chairman Risto Siilasmaa said he believed the sale would “raise deep feelings” among Finns, who regard the phone company as a national success.

But one shareholder told the Reuters news agency he was happy with the vote.

“Now it feels good again. This is a really good result,” said Hannu Ryyppo. “It’s a new beginning for Nokia.”

When the sale was first announced, Nokia said it would also make changes to its leadership.

Stephen Elop, the former president chief executive of Nokia Corporation, was to step down and resign from the company’s board under the terms of the deal.

Nokia has faced criticism over the 18.8m euro pay-out Mr Elop is set to receive when he leaves the company. He is due to move over to Microsoft when the sale is completed.

Mr Elop left Microsoft to join Nokia in 2010, and has been cited by some as one of the frontrunners to replace Microsoft’s outgoing chief executive Steve Ballmer.

Mr Ballmer is expected to leave the company in 2014

Exploding Samsung Galaxy phone leaves teenager with third degree burns and smelling like a ‘burnt pig’

A Swiss teenager suffered second and third degree burns when her smartphone apparently exploded in her pocket.

Fanny Schlatter, 18, was injured when the Samsung Galaxy S3 allegedly blew up in her trouser pocket.

She claims to have been left with no feeling in her right thigh and said she will be launching a criminal complaint against Samsung

French language paper Le Matin reported that Ms Schlatter was working as an painting apprentice when she heard a large bang.

She told the paper: ‘All of a sudden I heard the sound of an explosion – like a firecracker.

‘Then I noticed a strange chemical smell and my work trousers began to catch fire.’

By the time Ms Schlatter’s boss, Stephane Kubler, had come to her assistance, the flames had reached her shoulders.

She was rushed into the nearest bathroom where colleagues doused the flames before driving her to hospital.

Ms Schlatter explained: ‘Luckily my hair was tied up and my sweater didn’t have time to catch fire.’

However, she added that her burns were severe enough to make her smell like a ‘burnt pig’.

The burns have left Ms Schlatter with no feeling in her right thigh and the teenager has been signed off work until 15 August.

She now plans to file a legal complaint against the Korean phone maker.

In a statement, a Samsung spokesperson told the MailOnline: ‘Once we have gotten hold of the product in question, we will conduct a thorough examination to determine the exact cause of this incident.

‘We would like to assure our customers that we have always employed strict quality control and safety standards to ensure a safe and pleasant user experience.’

This is not the first time a Samsung Galaxy S3 battery has supposedly exploded.

In May this year, Reddit user Vizionx1208 posted pictures of his destroyed Samsung Galaxy S3 smartphone, claiming he was ‘awoken by a loud noise and a weird squeaking sound.’

He states the phone was on the verge of setting alight and his bedroom had filled with smoke and had a ‘pungent smell.

He was able to put out the smouldering phone by chucking a glass of water over it but the phone had already burnt his mattress cover and left a small burn on his finger.

Last year, an Irish Samsung S3 owner claimed his handset burst into flames as he was driving his car.

However, it was later discovered, following tests by the Fire Investigations UK (FIUK) team, that the phone had been previously placed in the microwave to remove water damage and this may have been the cause of the fire.

It isn’t just the S3 model that has this supposed fault either.

In South Korea in 2011, the battery from a Samsung Galaxy Note allegedly exploded in a man’s pocket as he walked along the street.

The explosion caused second degree burns and a one-inch wound to his thigh

It was the second time that year a battery from the Galaxy Note was said to have exploded in South Korea.

Elsewhere, a phone battery spontaneously caught fire in a man’s back pocket at the Defcon hacking conference in the U.S in 2010, and in 2009, a man was killed when his exploding phone severed his neck artery.

Last month, a fire in a Peterborough house was thought to have been caused by an exploding phone battery after a handset was left on charge overnight.

The fire crews did not release what make or model the battery came from but said damage was caused to the bedroom, where the phone was on charge, including the bed, furniture and serious smoke damage to the walls